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Yuan BAOJING

 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 
 
 
Classification: Murderer
Characteristics: Beijing's wealthiest multi-millionaire - Murder for hire
Number of victims: 1
Date of murder: October 4, 2003
Date of arrest: November 24, 2003
Date of birth: 1966
Victim profile: Wang Xing (had helped the billionaire in the attempted murder of a businessman)
Method of murder: Shooting
Location: Liaoning Province, China
Status: Executed by lethal injection on March 17, 2006
 
 
 
 
 
 
photo gallery
 
 
 
 
 
 

Yuan Baojing (simplified Chinese: 袁宝璟; traditional Chinese: 袁寶璟) (1966 March 17, 2006) was the president of the Jianhao Group and Beijing's wealthiest multi-millionaire.

In March 2006, he and two accomplices were sentenced to death by a Liaoyang court for the October 2003 murder of Wang Xing, a hitman he had hired to kill a rival businessman in Sichuan, who had caused his company to lose $13 million in futures trading.

The hitman later turned informer. Yuan was put to death just fifteen minutes after the sentence was pronounced, together with his brother and cousin Yuan Baoqi and Yuan Baosen. He was the wealthiest convict to be executed in PRC history.

Yuan was found guilty of the murder in January 2005 and was due to die by firing squad on October 14, 2005. After the date passed and the sentence was not carried out, it rumoured that the day before the execution date his wife transferred ownership of shares worth 49.5 billion yuan to the government. The assets comprised equities including a 40 percent stake in an Indonesian oil company held by Yuan through a Hong Kong firm.

Yuan Baojing, along with Yuan Baoqi and Yuan Baosen, were killed by lethal injection shortly after the trial. Yuan Baofu, also sentenced to death, had his sentence suspended for two years.

Yuan Baojing's wife Zhuoma, an ethnic Tibetan choreographer will almost certainly inherit the bulk of Yuan's fortune. China has no inheritance tax.

Wikipedia.org

 
 

Billionaire executed for contract murder

Shanghai Daily

2006-03-18 - ChinaView.cn

BEIJING, March 18 -- Billionaire Yuan Baojing and two other men were executed Friday in Liaoning Province in the contract killing of a man who threatened to expose Yuan's attempt to murder a businessman.

Yuan Baojing, Yuan Baoqi and Yuan Baosen got lethal injection shortly after a public trial in Liaoyang City.

A fourth criminal, Yuan Baofu, was sentenced to death, but the sentence was suspended for two years. That means the death sentence will be commuted to life imprisonment if he is a model inmate over two years.

The murder victim, Wang Xing, had helped the billionaire in the attempted murder of a businessman in southwestern China's Sichuan Province.

Yuan Baojing, a Liaoyang native, registered his Beijing Jianhao Industrial Development Company in Beijing's Huairou District in 1992, the Supreme People's Court reported.

Six months later, he made more than 2 million yuan (US$249,007) of profits. Then he invested in the securities and bonds markets before acquiring more than 60 companies. His assets were valued at more than 3 billion yuan as of 1996, the supreme court said.

He believed businessman friend Liu Han's manipulation of a broker caused him to lose nearly 100 million yuan in Sichuan Province, he told Yuan Baoqi and Wang at a Beijing hotel in late 1996.

Wang suggested punishing Liu. Yuan offered a reward of 160,000 yuan for murdering Liu.

Contract killer Li Haiyang fired two shots at Liu in a Sichuan hotel in February 1997. But the bullets missed Liu, and Li fled. Li was caught and sentenced to life imprisonment.

Starting from 1997, Yuan Baojing turned down Wang's requests to borrow money, and the latter threatened many times to blow the whistle on his crime of organizing the attempted murder.

In early 2001, Yuan Baoqi suggested killing Wang. Yuan Baojing agreed, and gave him 300,000 yuan to pay the contract killers. Yuan Baoqi found Yuan Baofu and Yuan Baosen.

On November 15, 2001, Yuan Baosen and Yuan Baofu stabbed Wang repeatedly, leaving him seriously injured, shortly after Wang left home. The duo fled.

Yuan Baoqi gave Yuan Baofu 90,000 yuan.

Wang continued threatening Yuan Baojing. Then Yuan Baoqi paid Yuan Baofu another 180,000 yuan to "finish the work."

Yuan Baofu and Yuan Baosen waited for Wang near midnight on October 4, 2003, when he left a majhong games shop in Lioayang. As Wang opened the gate to his apartment building, they shot him twice with a hunting rifle.

 
 

Billionaire executed for murder

Shanghai Daily/AP

2006-03-18

A Chinese tycoon once worth more than US$360 million has been executed by lethal injection for having a man who tried to blackmail him killed, a court statement and news reports said Saturday.

Yuan Baojing and two accomplices were put to death by lethal injection Friday after a court in China's northeastern Liaoning province upheld a death sentence handed down last year, said a notice on the official Web site of China's courts.

A fourth criminal, Yuan Baofu, was sentenced to death, but the sentence was suspended for two years. That means the death sentence will be commuted to life imprisonment if he is a model inmate over two years.

The murder victim, Wang Xing, had helped the billionaire in the attempted murder of a businessman in southwestern China's Sichuan Province.

News photos in several Chinese papers showed a bespectacled Yuan, wearing a white track suit and a long white scarf, standing in front of the judge in the Liaoyang City Intermediate People's Court.

"I refuse to accept it. I will inform against someone," the Beijing Youth Daily quoted Yuan as saying after the judge announced the final decision.

Yuan appeared "very agitated" as he was escorted out of the court, and was executed about 15 minutes later, the paper said.

Yuan, 40, was convicted in January last year of hiring a hit man in a failed plot to kill a business partner who had caused Yuan's company to lose 90 million yuan (US$11 million; euro8 million) in futures trading, according to earlier news reports.

The man who found the hit man for Yuan then blackmailed him, and Yuan paid his brother and then his cousin to kill the blackmailer. The blackmailer was shot to death in October 2003.

The charge cited for the execution was "intentional murder," the Web site said. Yuan's brother, Yuan Baoqi, and cousin, Yuan Baosen, were also executed Friday, it said.

Yuan Baojing, a Liaoyang native, registered his Beijing Jianhao Industrial Development Company in Beijing's Huairou District in 1992, the Supreme People's Court reported.

Six months later, he made more than 2 million yuan (US$249,000) of profits. Then he invested in the securities and bonds markets before acquiring more than 60 companies. His assets were valued at more than 3 billion yuan as of 1996, the supreme court said.

He believed businessman friend Liu Han's manipulation of a broker caused him to lose nearly 100 million yuan in Sichuan Province, he told Yuan Baoqi and Wang at a Beijing hotel in late 1996.

Wang suggested punishing Liu. Yuan offered a reward of 160,000 yuan for murdering Liu.

Contract killer Li Haiyang fired two shots at Liu in a Sichuan hotel in February 1997. But the bullets missed Liu, and Li fled. Li was caught and sentenced to life imprisonment.

Starting from 1997, Yuan Baojing turned down Wang's requests to borrow money, and the latter threatened many times to blow the whistle on his crime of organizing the attempted murder.

In early 2001, Yuan Baoqi suggested killing Wang. Yuan Baojing agreed, and gave him 300,000 yuan to pay the contract killers. Yuan Baoqi found Yuan Baofu and Yuan Baosen.

On November 15, 2001, Yuan Baosen and Yuan Baofu stabbed Wang repeatedly, leaving him seriously injured, shortly after Wang left home. The duo fled.

Yuan Baoqi gave Yuan Baofu 90,000 yuan.

Wang continued threatening Yuan Baojing. Then Yuan Baoqi paid Yuan Baofu another 180,000 yuan to "finish the work."

Yuan Baofu and Yuan Baosen waited for Wang near midnight on October 4, 2003, when he left a majhong games shop in Lioayang. As Wang opened the gate to his apartment building, they shot him twice with a hunting rifle.

Yuan's wife Zhuoma, a well-known Tibetan dancer who goes by one name, was not allowed to be present at the execution, the Beijing Youth Daily said. She was seen sobbing in a car outside the execution site and later received Yuan's ashes from the courts, it said.

The couple have a 4-year-old son, according to an earlier report in the North Morning Post newspaper.

 
 

Money now buys him life

The Standart

Thursday, November 03, 2005

Mainland billionaire Yuan Baojing escapes execution after handing his fortune to the state, writes Wu Zhong.

In China, a conviction and death sentence means certain execution. Nonetheless, on the morning of October 14, as he was about to be taken from his prison cell to be shot, an urgent order halted the execution of Yuan Baojing, the 39-year-old billionaire former boss of Beijing Jianhao Group and once one of China's fastest rising young entrepreneurs.

The case is being treated with extraordinary sensitivity by Beijing because two days later, Yuan's lawyer told the Shanghai-based China Business News the billionaire on the eve of his scheduled execution had transferred all his overseas assets, said to be worth tens of billions of yuan, to his wife. She is Zhou Ma, a well-known Tibetan dancer who teaches at the Beijing-based Central University for Nationalities. She agreed to transfer the money to the state.

It is traditional in China for prisoners to be given lavish banquets and visited by their families before their executions. Zhou Ma had come to see her husband.

The assets comprised equities including a 40 percent stake in an Indonesian oil company held by Yuan through a Hong Kong firm, which is reckoned to be worth about 50 billion yuan at current market value.

In addition, Yuan also passed to his newly acquired wife, bank accounts in Switzerland and elsewhere totaling "huge" amounts of money, his lawyer Liu Jiazong told China Business News. Liu would not reveal the exact figure but told the newspaper there was enough to make Zhuo Ma Asia's richest woman. "Now compared with her [wealth], even the number one on a publicized list of China's riches entrepreneurs will be dwarfed," he said.

The Forbes list for 2004 names Larry Yung (Larry Rong Zhijian), chairman of Hong Kong-based giant CITIC Pacific, as China's richest man with assets of US$1.5 billion.

Zhuo Ma told China Business News that she spoke with her husband just before he was about to be taken out for execution. He wished for her to donate all his wealth to the state, she said.

But since his life has been saved for the time being, she said she would spare no effort in attempting to reverse the verdict outright.

Since Zhou Ma's statements and those of her husband's lawyer appeared in the Shanghai-based newspaper, both have declined to speak to reporters. However, her comments immediately generated speculation that Yuan escaped death at the last minute because of his agreement to donate the huge sum to the state.

This is unprecedented. According to a Supreme Court judiciary interpretation, execution can be halted only when 1) the verdict is found to be wrong; 2) the convicted, awaiting death, provides leads to uncover other major criminal cases or renders outstanding meritorious service to the state; or 3) the convicted is pregnant. And after the execution is halted, it must report to a higher court for a new ruling.

Liu stressed that the suspension doesn't necessarily mean Yuan's life will be spared, since the death sentence could still be carried out after a review.

Although the obvious answer is that Yuan's life was spared by the contribution of what is believed to be an enormous amount of money to the state, a law researcher with the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences warned in an interview with The Standard that Beijing must handle the matter carefully or face jeopardizing the country's efforts to build a rule of law. The decision to spare Yuan's life suggests that money is simply above the law.

"If money could buy a life, then the law must clearly stipulate how much the price would be. Ten yuan? One million yuan or a hundred billion yuan? But this is ridiculous because it leads to the conclusion that the rich and the poor are not equal before the law," said the researcher, who declined to be named.

It is more likely, he added, that new evidence has been found, therefore, a review of his case is needed. Or Yuan may have provided clues to the uncovering of other criminal cases.

In the latter case, the researcher said, "such criminal cases ought to be very big ones which might involve very important persons to enable the suspension of his execution."

Thus, in either way, developments in Yuan's case will be dramatic and worth following closely, he said.

Yuan's path to riches is legendary. Born in 1966 to a poor worker's family in Liaoyang city in the northeastern province of Liaoning, Yuan in 1985 passed tough entrance exams to the Beijing-based Chinese University of Politics and Law. He had to take a low- paying part-time job to support his college study.

After his graduation four years later, Yuan joined the securities department of the China Construction Bank just as China began to restructure state-owned enterprises into joint-stock companies. Officials, employees of the SOEs and ordinary citizens were encouraged to buy stock.

Most people remained lukewarm as very few believed the reforms were promising - so much so that the Communist Party had to order its members and government officials to take the lead.

Yuan, however, saw an investment opportunity. China opened stock exchanges in Shanghai and Shenzhen with many of the joint-stock SOEs going public. Investors saw their share prices multiply geometrically.

Yuan made a small fortune. He also proved to be an excellent stock broker, with a record of 67 million yuan in a single day's trading volume.

In 1992, Yuan quit his job with CCB to set up his Jianhao company in a suburb of Beijing. Renting eight hectares of farm land, he grew good quality wheat seeds. He soon made his "first basket of gold" of three million yuan.

He then reoriented Jianhao's business to focus on securities. He helped restructure SOEs into joint-stock companies, acquiring stakes in them, and then helping to arrange their initial public offerings. At one time he jokingly called himself "China's No 1 stock player."

He may well have been. By 1996, his Jianhao Group's assets were estimated to be worth over three billion yuan.

Remembering his own bitter experience in school, the newly rich Yuan donated 10 million yuan to set up a scholarship in 1996 to help poor university students. He continued to make other charity donations and was given several awards for his outstanding achievements and good deeds.

Thus, his arrest on November 24, 2003, by Liaoyang police on suspicion of "hiring a hitman to murder" was shocking news.

On January 13, Yuan, together with his brother Yuan Baoqi, and Yuan Baosen, one of his cousins, were sentenced to death by the Intermediate Court of Liaoyang. Yuan Baofu, another of Yuan's cousin was given a suspended death sentence.

According to the court verdict, in the fall of 1996, Yuan and his brother met their accessory, Wang Xing, a former Liaoyang policeman, seeking to hire someone to kill a businessman named Liu Han. Yuan, the court verdict said, suspected that Liu had caused Jianhao Group a loss of 90 million yuan in trading futures in Chengdu.

Via his brother, Yuan passed 160,000 yuan to Wang. The brother, Yuan Baoqi, asked Wang to hire a hitman named Li Haiyang to shoot Liu Han. However, Liu narrowly escaped, the verdict said.

From 1997, Wang began to blackmail Yuan, demanding Yuan "lend" him money. After Yuan refused, Wang threatened to expose Yuan's involvement in the murder attempt.

In early 2001, the court verdict said, Yuan and his brother decided to kill Wang. Yuan gave his brother 300,000 yuan to carry out the mission. The brother talked to Yuan Baofu, a cousin, about the plan. Yuan Baofu discussed it with Yuan Baosen, Yuan's other cousin, and the latter agreed to take action.

In mid-November 2001, Yuan Baosen stabbed Wang, who was seriously injured but survived.

Wang continued to blackmail and threaten Yuan. Finally Yuan Baosen shot Wang to death with a hunting rifle on October 4, 2003.

Ultimately, the search for Wang's killer ended up at the Yuan family's door and all were arrested. In the subsequent trial, the Yuans appealed the verdict but were turned down, and the case played itself out to its present status.

As the Academy of Social Sciences researcher told The Standard, the possibility of buying one's way out of an execution raises all kinds of questions for the Chinese government. Or, if Yuan has provided authorities with information implicating other high-ranking businessmen or government figures, more sensational trials are possible.

In any case, where Yuan and his money go from here is an increasingly intricate guessing game that will play itself out in China's corridors of power.

 

 

 
 
 
 
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